Movie Monday: The Legend of 5 Mile Cave

Movie Monday The Legend of 5 Mile Cave (2)

It’s the year 1929, and Tommy and his mom are struggling to keep the family farm from foreclosure. One bright spot in Tommy’s life is his passion for reading adventure stories, such as the one about a stagecoach robber named Shooter Green, who hid $200,000 in stolen gold.

legend of 5 mile cave.jpg

Flashback to the late 1800s and Shooter Green has become somewhat of an icon in Arizona. A sharpshooter, he earns his money by spectator bets on whether or not he can hit the target.  That is until the day he falls in love and everything changes. To support the love of his life, he takes on a job protecting a stagecoach carrying a large amount of cash.

The Legend of 5 Mile Cave is a movie with some drama, a bit of romance, and a whole lot of adventure packed into an enjoyable flick for the entire family. It alternates smoothly between Tommy’s life and Shooter Green’s in two different times. Their lives soon intersect when a man visits Tommy’s farm looking to board and help out with chores.

This is a clean wholesome movie with nothing objectionable (although the very young may get frightened when a man is shot, but nothing is shown other than him falling off his horse and hitting his head on a rock. Two other men are also shot, but nothing is shown). It is truly a western with bad guys and good guys; with gunslingers and surprise endings. It’s one of those movies that is a delight to watch from the beginning scene to the end when the credits roll.

I give The Legend of 5 Mile Creek a five out of five stars and highly recommend it for viewers ages seven and up.

 

Advertisements

Movie Monday: Run the Race

Movie Monday Run the Race.png

Twin brothers, Zach and David, decide to do whatever it takes to leave their small, podunk town after graduation. Working together, they figure that if Zach can just get a scout from Florida to notice him during a high school football game, that will be their ticket out of town.

What both Zach and David don’t anticipate is an injury that sidelines Zach.

What will become of their dream to leave and Zach’s dream to play football for the Florida Gators?

The boys haven’t had an easy life as of late. Having lost their mom to cancer a few years prior, their alcoholic dad has all but abandoned them. The bright spot in their lives is Nanny, their godmother, who is not only there for them, but also seeks to help them grow in their faith.

This movie, produced by Tim Tebow and his brother, Robby, is a heartfelt one with some humor, a bit of romance, and some difficult issues the characters must tackle. Faith is an important component to the story, and David’s and Nanny’s faith shines brightly in what is otherwise a difficult time for two boys given a hard shake in life. It is so much more than another sports movie…it features love, forgiveness, redemption, and hope.

There is nothing objectionable in the movie, although there is a scene with some underage drinking (an excellent opening for a chat with kids after family night concludes). Difficult issues include grief, loss, being unequally yoked, bitterness, anger, and some bad choices. It is well-made, features strong acting, and has an even stronger message that will leave you thinking about the movie long after its conclusion.

I’m happy to recommend Run the Race and give it five out of five stars.

 

 

Movie Monday: The Mask Murder

the mask murder movie monday

A who-dunnit with just enough twists and turns to throw off the viewer…

In The Mask Murder, one of the many in the Garage Sale Mystery movie series, Jenn finds a dead body in a storage locker. How did she get there, who killed her, and why is there a plaster mask that resembles the victim? Could it be clue that leads to the killer? Is Jennifer’s life in danger as she closes in on solving this mystery?

Meanwhile, Hannah learns a lesson about what’s really important when her dad helps her with a college building project constructing tiny houses for homeless people.

Hallmark does a remarkable job with The Garage Sale Mystery series. While they are suspenseful and include a variety of potential suspects in each episode, the series never delves into gratuitous violence or other unwholesome aspects. That being said, this and other episodes are for teens and older due to the storyline and content.

garage sale mysteryOne of my favorite things about this series is that it depicts a family of four with a husband and wife who love each other. Not another series with hateful banter, disrespectful children, or a dumbing down of the dad. The children (one who is a teen and the other who is a college student) both have their own lives, yet are an active (and close) part of the family unit.

 

One of the things I enjoy most about reviewing movies is finding ones that are safe for the family, void of language, sexuality, violence, and gore. The Garage Sale Mystery episodes fill the bill for that criteria.

A side note, but one I feel is important to mention is the recent “news” regarding actress Lori Loughlin (Jenn in the Garage Sale series). I’m saddened that due to her alleged choices, the series won’t continue as is. She did an excellent job, as did the others actors and actresses. My hope is that she would own up to what she allegedly did, apologize, and do her best to make amends. It would be an excellent example of redemption.

 

Movie Monday: Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The Road Less Traveled

Movie Monday Signed Sealed Delivered The Road Less Traveled (REAL ONE).png

What happens when the POstables find a seemingly old disposable camera in the lost and misdirected mail with pictures on it? And not just any pictures, but one including a note with a child’s writing begging to be reunited with his dad?

Was the child kidnapped? If so, where is he/she now? The pictures offer few clues.

signed sealed delivered road less traveled

The POstables set out to find the answer. And so the adventure across Colorado begins in the old Winnebago that Rita’s parents gifted Norman and Rita. Along the way, the group not only discovers the surprising answer to their mystery, but also some important things about their relationships along the way. Will Rita complete the 100 things she “must” do according to a wedding magazine before she and Norman get married? Why is Norman being so evasive? And who is Alex Brighton – the one who continues to text Shayne? Does Oliver have reason to be concerned?

Humor, romance, drama, a mystery, and clean wholesome viewing occur once again in this episode. It contains nothing objectionable. However, young children may be frightened by the “kidnapping” theme. It is appropriate for tweens and up.

 

Those of you who follow the Movie Monday reviews on my blog likely realize that the Signed, Sealed, Delivered series is among my favorites. It’s right up there with the Sue Thomas, F.B.Eye Series,Where Love Found Me, The Redemption of Henry Myers, The Secrets of Jonathan Sperry, Finding Normal, Beautifully Broken, Unbroken: Path to Redemption, and Beyond the Mask. All awesome movies for family night (among many more too numerous to list, but that can be found on my Mom-Approved Movie Listing).

As a matter of fact, I can’t wait to watch the next installment of Signed, Sealed, Delivered when Rita and Norman finally head to the altar. Will Shayne and Oliver be next?

Movie Monday: Hailey Dean 3-Film Collection

Movie Monday Hailey Dean (2)

Romantic suspense is one of my favorite genres (only behind historical and contemporary romance), so when I discovered clean suspense movies, I was thrilled.

Hailey Dean (played by Kellie Martin) is a former prosecutor. Now she’s a therapist who finds herself solving mysteries.

She joins close friends, Danny, who is the brother of her murdered fiance; Fincher, an investigator for the D.A.’s office; her boyfriend, Jonas, who is a medical examiner; and her therapist partner, Sabrina. Fincher brings comic relief to the series with his obsession with Mexican food trucks (and eating in general). Jonas, a more serious fellow, never really realizes what he’s in for when he accompanies Hailey on one of her “investigations,” disguised as a date. Danny turns to her for assistance in everything from missing persons cases to murders that aren’t as easy to solve as they may seem. Sabrina is a more dramatic character.

hailey dean

One of the pros of the Hailey Dean mysteries is the whole setup of the cast of characters that the viewer gets to see, as they attempt to figure how whodunit. It’s not always a clear-cut case, and the writers of the show do an excellent job of choosing someone as the perp who isn’t always the obvious choice.

The Hailey Dean mysteries (there are six available on DVD/streaming at the writing of this review) are clean and avoid stepping over the boundaries when it comes to violence. However, they are not for children, but rather 13 and up.

A fun added bonus? Nancy Grace, the author of the Hailey Dean series, of which the movies are based on, makes an appearance as a reporter in several of the episodes.

I give the Hailey Dean Mysteries a rating of a solid 4 out of 5.

 

 

 

Movie Monday: Flying High for the Glory of God: The Orville Rogers Story

Flying High for the Glory of God movie monday

When I stumbled across Flying High for the Glory of God: The Orville Rogers Story, it piqued my curiosity.

Orville Rogers was born in 1917. However, at 101, Orville isn’t ready to take it easy just yet. He runs marathons (and holds many world records) and keeps himself in excellent shape. His mind is sharp.

And he has led an adventurous life.

Flying High for the Glory of God.jpg

Orville is a patriot, having fought for our country in both WWII, where he was a bomber pilot instructor, and in the Korean War. He’s also flown for numerous ministry missions to a variety of remote places.

He was the husband of Esther Beth for over sixty-four years. He’s a father, grand-father, and a great-grandfather.

But the thing that stuck out most to me in watching this documentary? Orville’s love for God and his courage in sharing that love. As a matter of fact, one of my favorite parts of the movie is when he’s in a taxi and he’s sharing about Jesus with the cab driver. (But he’s never overbearing). Orville is devout in his faith – something we don’t always see as often in today’s men.

Throughout the short movie, Orville shares about his passions: his faith, his family, flying, and running. It is never slow or boring, but rather uplifting and inspirational.

I found myself wishing the movie was longer – I wanted to know even more about Orville’s life and his testimony. His book, The Running Man: Flying High for the Glory of God is next on my list!

Flying High for the Glory of God: The Orville Rogers Story is available to stream or to purchase as a DVD. It is appropriate for the entire family.

Rating: 5 stars.

 

 

Movie Monday: Unplanned

“What she saw changed everything.”

Unplanned

When Unplanned finally came to my small-town theater, I was excited to support this film that was unapologetically pro-life. Based on the true story of former Planned Parenthood Clinic Director, Abby Johnson, Unplanned is a movie that stays with the viewer long after the credits roll.

There are some difficult scenes to watch, namely:

At the beginning when Abby is called to assist with an abortion,

The scene with Abby in the bathroom after taking the abortion pill RU-486,

The scene with the young girl who nearly died when her uterus is perforated during an abortion,

And when Abby is called into the POC room at the beginning of her tenure at Planned Parenthood and we witness the tiny parts of a baby needing to be reconstructed to be sure the doctor removed all parts during the abortion.

Disclaimer: I did avert my eyes during several of those scenes.

There is also some minor language throughout the film.

Perhaps one of the ironies I discovered with the Unplanned movie is that horror flicks that garner an R rating show disgusting and oftentimes perverse themes. Bloody corpses, zombies, and the like are commonplace for that genre. (You can probably sense that I am not a horror flick fan and have seen only one in my life as a teen, and one I regret subjecting my eyes to).

In contrast, Unplanned shows the reality on film of tiny babies being murdered. It’s truth, not something from someone’s imagination like a horror film.

I loved how both Abby’s husband and her parents, while in disagreement over her choice of career, stood by her and prayed for her heart to be changed. Friends she made along the fence outside the clinic did the same. Prayer is powerful, and when God has a plan, nothing and no one can stop it.

Perhaps two of the biggest themes in the movie are redemption and forgiveness. Forgiveness not just of others, but of oneself. Abby struggles to forgive herself for her role in contributing to thousands of abortions and for her own abortions.

One of the other things I really appreciated about the movie was that it did not condemn women who have had abortions. As I discuss in my blog post the importance of life, a close friend of mine had an abortion years ago. She confided to me that, while she remains pro-choice, not a day goes by that she doesn’t think about her baby and what he or she may be like if she had chosen life. She struggles with forgiving herself.

Thankfully, we serve a mighty God, who can forgive us as far as the east is from the west (Psalm 103:12). Abby discovers this in Unplanned, as she, too, has had not one, but two abortions.

Is Unplanned difficult to watch? Yes.

Is it intense and grisly in parts? Yes.

Will it leave you emotional and burdened for the preborn? Yes.

Is it a movie for children? NO.

Sadly, when we entered the theater, we noticed that several back row seats were filled with little children – some about three or four years old and none older than about seven. While this movie is an important one, it’s not one for children. I honestly cannot state that often enough. It’s not for children. It’s not even for young teens.

Due to the graphic nature, this movie’s target audience is older teens and adults. And those older teens should be watching it with their parent(s) and discussing it afterwards.

But while this movie isn’t for young teens, it’s important to begin discussing with your children the importance of life. Our girls knew that a baby was a baby from the moment God placed it in a mommy’s tummy. That was our simplest explanation when they were little and discussions were age-appropriate as they grew older.

I would highly recommend this movie. But be warned, it will change you. Bring a box of Kleenex and a prayer in your heart. It will leave you with a prayer for people to again someday see the value of life “from womb to tomb,” a prayer for those contemplating abortion that they would choose adoption or to raise the child themselves, and a prayer for those women who have had abortions. That God would heal their broken hearts.

Rating: Five out of five stars.